South Africa hires innovative Indian farmer via Facebook | Vancouverdesi.com

A Bihar farmer who set a paddy cultivation record has been hired on a five-year contract by the South African government to train farmers there in the innovative System of Rice Intensification (SRI) method for which he will be paid the equivalent of Rs.50,000 (8,800 rand/$826) a month – all thanks to Facebook.

“It is Facebook that helped me to get this rare opportunity to train farmers of South Africa to grow paddy by using the SRI method,” Sumant Kumar, a farmer in Darveshpura village in Nalanda district, who had created a World record in 2011 by producing 224 quintals of paddy per hectare using the method, told IANS on the phone Tuesday.

Sumant, who has studied till class 12, said that South African officials contacted him through his Facebook page, after which they telephoned him.

“Things materialized following several rounda of discussions and representatives of the South African visited my native village for signing of a formal contract with me (on Aug 19),” he said.

“I am going to South Africa in October to start my new innings abroad. It is first time that I would be visiting a foreign country. I will receive a monthly salary (the equivalent) of Rs 50,000 and five percent of the profit generated by paddy cultivation,” he added.

Sumant is the first farmer of Bihar who attracted attention outside the country for his record in paddy cultivation. Munich-based journalist Vetina Vez has said that her documentary will highlight organic farming as well as the SRI method used by Sumant and thousands of farmers in Bihar that uses less water but triples yields.

South Africa hires innovative Indian farmer via Facebook | Vancouverdesi.com

A Bihar farmer who set a paddy cultivation record has been hired on a five-year contract by the South African government to train farmers there in the innovative System of Rice Intensification (SRI) method for which he will be paid the equivalent of Rs.50,000 (8,800 rand/$826) a month – all thanks to Facebook.

“It is Facebook that helped me to get this rare opportunity to train farmers of South Africa to grow paddy by using the SRI method,” Sumant Kumar, a farmer in Darveshpura village in Nalanda district, who had created a World record in 2011 by producing 224 quintals of paddy per hectare using the method, told IANS on the phone Tuesday.

Sumant, who has studied till class 12, said that South African officials contacted him through his Facebook page, after which they telephoned him.

“Things materialized following several rounda of discussions and representatives of the South African visited my native village for signing of a formal contract with me (on Aug 19),” he said.

“I am going to South Africa in October to start my new innings abroad. It is first time that I would be visiting a foreign country. I will receive a monthly salary (the equivalent) of Rs 50,000 and five percent of the profit generated by paddy cultivation,” he added.

Sumant is the first farmer of Bihar who attracted attention outside the country for his record in paddy cultivation. Munich-based journalist Vetina Vez has said that her documentary will highlight organic farming as well as the SRI method used by Sumant and thousands of farmers in Bihar that uses less water but triples yields.

A school dropout from a poor family in southern India has revolutionised menstrual health for rural women in developing countries by inventing a simple machine they can use to make cheap sanitary pads.

A school dropout from a poor family in southern India has revolutionised menstrual health for rural women in developing countries by inventing a simple machine they can use to make cheap sanitary pads.

prepaidafrica:

England
Between 1761 and 1808, British traders hauled 1,428,000 African captives across the Atlantic and pocketed $96.5 million – about $13 billion in value today – from selling them as slaves. From 1500 to 1860, by very modest estimations, around 12 million Africans were traded into slavery in the Americas.
In British vessels alone, 3.25 million Africans were shipped. These voyages were often very profitable. For instance, in the 17th century, the Royal Africa Company could buy an enslaved African with trade goods worth $5 and sell that person in the Americas for $32, making an average net profit of 38 percent per voyage.
Slave-owning planters and merchants who dealt in slaves and slave produce were among the richest people in 18th-century Britain, but many other British citizens benefited from the human trafficking industry. Profits from slavery were used to endow All Souls College, Oxford, with a splendid library; to build a score of banks, including the Bank of London and Barclays; and to finance the experiments of James Watt, inventor of the first efficient steam engine.
As the primary catalyst for the Industrial Revolution, the transatlantic slave trade provided factory owners who dealt in textiles, iron, glass and gun-making a mega-market in West Africa, where their goods were traded for slaves. Birmingham had over 4,000 gun-makers, with 100,000 guns a year going to slave-traders. The boom in manufacturing provided many jobs for ordinary people in Britain who, in addition to working in factories, could be employed to build roads and bridges, and in whaling, mining, etc.
(via Top 6 Countries That Grew Filthy Rich From Enslaving Black People - Page 2 of 6 - Atlanta Black Star)
Ed’s Note: We cannot go forward into the emerging future of Africa’s social and economic rise without a moment to reflect on the hundreds of indentured labour shipped from India’s field’s to Britain’s global Dominions. How much for that labour and food during WW1 & 2?

prepaidafrica:

England

Between 1761 and 1808, British traders hauled 1,428,000 African captives across the Atlantic and pocketed $96.5 million – about $13 billion in value today – from selling them as slaves. From 1500 to 1860, by very modest estimations, around 12 million Africans were traded into slavery in the Americas.

In British vessels alone, 3.25 million Africans were shipped. These voyages were often very profitable. For instance, in the 17th century, the Royal Africa Company could buy an enslaved African with trade goods worth $5 and sell that person in the Americas for $32, making an average net profit of 38 percent per voyage.

Slave-owning planters and merchants who dealt in slaves and slave produce were among the richest people in 18th-century Britain, but many other British citizens benefited from the human trafficking industry. Profits from slavery were used to endow All Souls College, Oxford, with a splendid library; to build a score of banks, including the Bank of London and Barclays; and to finance the experiments of James Watt, inventor of the first efficient steam engine.

As the primary catalyst for the Industrial Revolution, the transatlantic slave trade provided factory owners who dealt in textiles, iron, glass and gun-making a mega-market in West Africa, where their goods were traded for slaves. Birmingham had over 4,000 gun-makers, with 100,000 guns a year going to slave-traders. The boom in manufacturing provided many jobs for ordinary people in Britain who, in addition to working in factories, could be employed to build roads and bridges, and in whaling, mining, etc.

(via Top 6 Countries That Grew Filthy Rich From Enslaving Black People - Page 2 of 6 - Atlanta Black Star)

Ed’s Note: We cannot go forward into the emerging future of Africa’s social and economic rise without a moment to reflect on the hundreds of indentured labour shipped from India’s field’s to Britain’s global Dominions. How much for that labour and food during WW1 & 2?